NEPAL TREKKING & EXPEDITION
 Nepal Major Trekking Areas
Everest Region
Annapurna Region
Langtang Region
Manaslu Trekking
Mustang Trekking
Dhaulagiri circuit Trek
Dolpo Phoksundo Lake Trek
Rara Lake Trekking
Ganesh Himal Trekking
Rolwaling Trekking
Kanchanjunga Trekking
Makalu Trekking
Easy Trek
  HOME
  NEPAL
  TIBET
  BHUTAN
  INDIA
Climbing Peaks
Chulu East Peak 6584m.
Kusum Kangaru Peak
Hiunchuli Peak 6441m.
Island Peak 6160m.
Mardi Himal Peak 5587m.
Mera Peak 6467m.
Nepal Expeditions
Everest Expedition
Amadablam Expedition
Mt. Baruntse Expedition
Manaslu Expedition
Pumori Expedition
Dhaulagiri Expedition
Quick Search
Nepal Trekking
Mountaineering
Expedition
Places to See
Nepal wildlife Safari
White Water Rafting
Adventure Activities
Travel Ticketing
Accommodation
Package Tours
Online Inquiry
 
Destinations
>>
Popular Cities
>>
Parks, Reserves & Conservation
>>
Rural Tourism
>>
Hill Stations
>>
UNESCO Heritage Sites
>>
Pilgrimage Sites
 
Things to do in Nepal
>>
Trekking
>>
Mountaineering
>>
Expedition
>>
Nepal Wildlife Safari
>>
White Water Rafting
>>
Adventure Tours
>>
Body, Mind, and Soul
>>
Entertainment & Sports
Travel Tips
>>
General Information
>>
How to get there
>>
Suggested Itinerary
>>
Accommodation
>>
Getting Around
>>
Tourist Police
>>
Nepal Climate
>>
People & Society
>>
Nepal Language
>>
Nepal Religions
 

Nepal - Trekking in Nepal

A Trek is Not a Climbing Trip
Whether you begin your trek at a roadhead or fly into a remote mountain airstrip, a large part of it will be in the Middle Hills region at elevations between 500 and 3000 metres. In this region, there are always well-developed trails through villages and across mountain passes. Even at high altitudes there are intermittent settlements used during summer by shepherds, so the trails, though often indistinct, are always there. You can easily travel on any trail without the aid of ropes or mountaineering skills. There are rare occasions when there is snow on the trail, and on some high passes it might be necessary to place a safety line for your companions or porters if there is deep snow. Still, alpine techniques are almost never used on a traditional trek. Anyone who has walked extensively in the mountains has all the skills necessary for an extended trek in Nepal.

Though some treks venture near glaciers, and even cross the foot of them, most treks do not allow the fulfilment of any Himalayan mountaineering ambitions. Nepal's mountaineering regulations allow trekkers to climb 18 specified peaks with a minimum of formality, but you must still make a few advance arrangements for such climbs. Many agents offer so-called climbing treks which include the ascent of one of these peaks as a feature of the trek. There are a few peaks that, under ideal conditions, are within the resources of individual trekkers. A climb can be arranged in Kathmandu if conditions are right, but a climb of one of the more difficult peaks should be planned well in advance.

A Trek Requires Physical Effort
A trek is physically demanding because of its length and the almost unbelievable changes in elevation. During the 300-km trek from Jiri to Everest base camp and return, for example, the trail gains and loses more than 9000 metres of elevation during many steep ascents and descents. On most treks, the daily gain is less than 800 metres in about 15 km, though ascents of as much as 1200 metres are possible on some days. You can always take plenty of time during the day to cover this distance, so the physical exertion, though quite strenuous at times, is not sustained. You also can stop frequently and take plenty of time for rest.

Probably the only physical problem that may make a trek impossible is a history of knee problems on descents. In Nepal the descents are long, steep and unrelenting. There is hardly a level stretch of trail in the entire country. If you are an experienced walker and often hike 15 km a day with a pack, a trek should prove no difficulty. You will be pleasantly surprised at how easy the hiking can be if you only carry a light backpack and do not have to worry about meal preparation.

Previous experience in hiking and living outdoors is, however, helpful as you make plans for your trek. The first night of a month-long trip is too late to discover that you do not like to sleep in a sleeping bag. Mountaineering experience is not necessary, but you must enjoy walking.

Nepal Trekking Areas
>>
Everest Region
>>
Annapurna Region
>>
Langtang Region
>>
Manaslu Trekking
>>
Mustang Trekking
>>
Dhaulagiri circuit Trek
>>
Dolpo Phoksundo Lake Trek
>>
Rara Lake Trekking
>>
Ganesh Himal Trekking
>>
Rolwaling Trekking
>>
Kanchanjunga Trekking
>>
Makalu Trekking
>>
Kathmandu Valley Trek
Trekking Information
>>
What is Trekking
>>
Why to Trek
>>
When to Trek
>>
Types of Trekking
>>
Trekking Permits
>>
Trekking Grades
Climbing Peaks
>>

Chulu East Peak 6584m.

>>

Chulu West Peak 6419m

>>

Hiunchuli Peak 6441m.

>>

Island Peak 6160m.

>>
Khongma Tse 5849m.
>>
Kusum Kangru 6367m.
>>
Kwangde Ri Peak 6011m
>>
Lobuje Peak 6119m.
>>
Mardi Himal Peak 5587m.
>>
Mera Peak 6467m.
>>
Naya Kanga Peak 5844m
>>
Paldor Peak 5896m.
>>
Pharchamo Peak 6187m.
>>
Pisang Peak 6091m.
>>
Pokhalde Peak 5806m.
>>
Ramdung Peak 5925m.
>>
Singu Chuli Peak 6501m.
>>
Tharpu Chuli 5663m.
Package Tours
>>
Across Kingdom Tour
>> All Nepal Tour
>> Culture Heritage Tour
>> Glimpse of Kathmandu
>> Honey Hunting Tour
>> Nepal Sightseeing Tour
>> Manakamana Lumbini Tour
>> Western Nepal Tour
>> wounder Of Nepal
Copyrights © rhinotreks.com, All Rights Reserved.